X

Song reviews

 

  I Only Want You For Your Rock and Roll by Keys



I Only Want You For Your Rock and Roll cover art


Raucous

Guitars turned up to the max? Yes! Sleazy streetwise attitude present and correct? Oh yes! God bless Keys for making “I Only Want You For Your Rock and Roll” into the kind of song that actively encourages delinquent behaviour. Play loud.


Review date:  July 28, 2019
  www.facebook.com/KEYSband1

  Work by Emily Breeze



Work cover art


Intelligent

Despite, or perhaps, because of, the low key retro electro intro, Emily Breeze manages to take her song “Work” on a journey from the computer to the heart and that heart is that of a literate, and ironic, songwriter.


Review date:  July 27, 2019
  www.facebook.com/EmilyBreezeMusic

  Med Tiden Gror by Sublime Eyes



Med Tiden Gror cover art


Solid

Melodic metal gets some Scandinavian style with Sublime Eyes doing their Norwegian best to turn their song “Med Tiden Gror” into the kind of anthem that destroys stadiums. With the volume turned, you might well believe that this song will do just that.


  Sharknado Circle Pit by Go Go Ponies



Sharknado Circle Pit cover art


Energetic

Winning this weeks’ award for best song title, Go Go Ponies kick it up with some flair and duly turn their song “Sharknado Circle Pit” into a punk meets hard rock hybrid destined to damage the walls anywhere that they might play.


Review date:  July 27, 2019
  www.facebook.com/gogoponies

  Take You Down by Weston Rd



Take You Down cover art


Polished

OK, so Weston Rd dig up all the best moves from rock history to power their song “Take You Down” but it is undeniable that they do so with notable style. Powerhouse lead vocals from Joe Blanks polish the song off nicely.


Review date:  July 27, 2019
  www.facebook.com/WestonRdMusic

  The Wolf by Freja Frances



The Wolf cover art


Melancholy

Minor key melancholy sets the mood for “The Wolf” and Freja Frances weaves enough metaphorical ambiguity into her words to make her song seem deeper than even the shadows in her heart. Worth a second or even third play.


Review date:  July 27, 2019
  www.facebook.com/frejafrances

  Mr. Tomorrow by Kyra Mastro



Mr. Tomorrow cover art


Literate

Kyra Mastro puts more effort than most would do into her song “Mr. Tomorrow” with the result evoking comparison with the more literate female singer songwriters of the seventies. Add in a dash of offbeat charm and this one proves appealing to the ears


Review date:  July 21, 2019
  www.facebook.com/kyra.rascal

  Magnetic Moves by Katie Toupin



Magnetic Moves cover art


Sharp

As was always the case, polished pop music needs a good song and Katie Toupin gives us just that with “Magnetic Moves” oozing commerciality whilst hiding a deeper message in the sharp edged lyrics. Ears and brains blessed with maturity will appreciate this one.


Review date:  July 21, 2019
  katietoupinmusic.com

  What You Need by Zeke Finn



What You Need cover art


Indie

Looping insistently might seem like taking the easy way out but Zeke Finn knows where he is going and he duly takes his song “What You Need” straight down the laptop indie pop with a purpose road to deliver his simple message to you.


Review date:  July 21, 2019
  www.zekefinn.com

  Nothing (Until Something Else Comes Along) by FUR



Nothing (Until Something Else Comes Along) cover art


Groovy

The trashy guitars make FUR’s three minute indie pop meets fifties retro song into something rather special with “Nothing (Until Something Else Comes Along)” making you wish that nothing else would come along. Put this one on repeat.


Review date:  July 14, 2019
  www.facebook.com/furbabyfur

  Wear Me Out by Lush Puppy



Wear Me Out cover art


Loopy

“Wear Me Out” is the kind of song that clearly aims to be quirkier than your average urban song and, whilst mercilessly looping itself as such songs do, Lush Puppy throw in enough oddball charm to make your ears prick up and pay attention.


  Lustfire by Kat Koan



Lustfire cover art


Cool

Almost self-consciously trendy, Kat Koan draws her inspiration from the robotic rhythms of the dancefloor and thus renders her song “Lustfire” in shades of super cool poetic repetition. I feel a placement in an ad for an electric Jaguar in Kat Koan’s future.



Page 3 of 137   ◼◀2 3 4►◼